The Electricity of New York










Its our first night and I can’t help but people watch— I’m so fascinated by the contagious energy, the people, the lights and all its aliveness. Despite the cold, we took beers to our our balcony, walked out to the edge of our fire scape and stared out into the twinkling lights of the streets and its historic alleyways. Curiously peeking into windows, as if to get a glimpse of the people’s lives around us. One of my favorite things about our travels is the glimpse of the different lifestyles and the exciting paths that people have chosen to take. I love seeing locals in their element. Where they grab their morning coffee, their favorite bookstore, and the friends they’ve made at their frequent sandwich shops.  I think many of us can agree that it takes a certain level of grit and passion to make it out in New York. You constantly hear people tell you “ you don’t want to move out there it’s too expensive”, “its too crowded” “nothing is easy there” — yet so many still make the move there, and it inspires me just at the thought of bumping shoulders with the people who push past what’s defined as easy, or practical.  I love, love, love places like these, places that remind you how small you are and how infinitely large the world is around you. A place that makes you want to write in your journal, exposes you to the inspiring, the unsafe, the cold and the romance of discovering all its corners.  We wandered over to Brooklyn in hopes we would fall in love with its personality.. but only on our way out did I feel as if I have gotten a glimpse of its charm. But isn’t that the charm of places like these? The same charm that us junk and thrift store hunters seek? The thrill of the hunt is as gratifying as discovering its gems? Those willing to keep their eyes wide open and their heart seeking will indeed find it as a gem.

Film is not dead.

A few years ago, Aaron received an old Nikon film camera as a Christmas present from his grandmother. Since then it has been a travel necessity for us. Film has given us more thought behind each shot, as well as patience for developing the rolls. To our surprise, it has been much easier and more affordable to shoot with film overseas than in the U.S., where film has become quite hard to find and pricey to develop. I came across these amazing expired film shots by Tamara Skudies. These nostalgic shots were taken with Kodak Ektachrome 100 Plus film, capturing the essence of the Austrian landscape. WOW.

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Image source

Hmong Textile Inspirations

While living in Thailand, we found ourselves constantly in awe of the Hmong tribe’s weaving, stitching and batiking of textiles. After visiting the Hmong village and learning first hand the amount of skill and attention to detail that was passionately put into every thread, my appreciation grew ten-fold. My head starting spinning of ways to celebrate and share their amazing artwork. To turn them into pillow covers, skirts, curtains, … the works. These beautiful pieces are still on the top of our list of our most valued pieces that we carry. Seeing these amazing articles of clothing made from beautiful Hmong textiles has me wanting to get out my scissors and get to it!









Shop our collection of Hmong Textiles here!

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Forest Offerings by Karolina

is one of my favorite artists. Her art is incredible, always evolving into prisms of color and textures. From photography, to hand-made costumes, to her forest offerings, they all combine the beauty of nature with the playfulness and the kaleidoscopic trip of her art. Here’s a quote as she connects with the therapeutic elements of creating these beautiful forest offerings in nature.

“Finally a whole grid appeared on the southern slope of one Wise Mountain. A grid of geometrical structures, each was made with different intention, vibrating with different energies. And each was programmed to heal the land and to shift its vibration; it definitely does its work! During the time spent in the forest, I could get to know the inhabitants of my surroundings, cause in almost every location I had spent couple of days. The birds started singing new songs, melodies I’ve never heard before, and these were the happy songs. The neighboring trees seemed glad too.” – Karolina

See more of her art.







A Handmade Home






An inspiring story of a pair of young artists who was inspired by a vision of creating a space that honored the beauty of nature and captured the light’s essence. Nick is photographer and Lilah a clothing designer; who quit their jobs to build a space of inspiration. Both having an artist’s resourcefulness, they built their cabin for $500, using their own two hands and a u-haul filled with salvaged wood and windows.

“Light is so different in the morning, at noon and at dusk. We wanted to somehow build a house so that change happened in our living space,” Olson said. “It’s about being closer to living with the elements.”


Snippets from Utah









As we drive through Utah’s vast, infinite sky, layers of canyonlands sprawl out as far as the eye can see. I was spellbound by the colors that waved through the clouds and the deep red formations made me feel as if I was on Mars. We wanted to pull the car over every five minute to try and capture it, as if it was our way of preserving the beauty we were seeing. I remember wishing the drive through Utah would last until we got to our destination. It truly is a special place of high vibrations. It tugs at each person differently, making each person connect with a unique energy all their own. Some moments are meant to be kept, but I feel like our moments through Utah are meant to be shared. Happy Sunday <3

Gypset Style: Les Gazelles Mexican Dress

The beautiful tale of these two sisters will make you daydream about to sailing your life away into the unknown. Truly an inspiration for an alternate lifestyle and following your bliss. The Mignot sisters also known as Les Gazelles were born into a big family consisting of nine brothers and sisters, all born from various parts of the world. Their parents were wanderlusts in its truest essence. Sharing their nomadic lifestyle, they raised their kids while exploring various countries. During a serendipitous stay in St. Barth’s, the family got the idea to buy a seventy-five foot wooden boat, which they painted in the vibrant colors of red, gold and green. Displaying the true Rasta spirit of don’t worry be happy! They sailed around the world for a decade accumulating a circle of friends, lovers, and children along the way. The beautiful gypsy family grew into three boats, seeking the best surf towns and forgotten beaches around the world. It was in Sayulta, a free spirited surf town in Mexico that the sisters decided to settle as the rest of their family sailed on. They lived together in a charming home which also housed their worldly-bohemian boutique Pacha Mama. And how about these amazing embroidered mexican-bohemian dresses?! Find these gypset inspired dresses now in the shop!


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Photo source 1/ Photo source 2

Tropical Inspiration

Packing to re-visit Aaron’s homeland of Palau, an untouched (and many times, unheard of) gem in the pacific. So excited to visit both of our families together to announce our engagement before heading back to the U.S.! Might be out of radar for the next couple weeks..but for now, a little tropical inspiration for you <3





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Artist Commune: Drop City




drop city



In the midst of the counterculture of the 60’s, a group of recently graduated art students found themselves in the middle of nowhere, Colorado. This was the beginning of the first hippie and artist communes that started in Trinidad, Colorado. It was inspired by their impromptu performances called “drop art” which consisted of dropping random objects off of top of buildings to watch reactions of passerby’s. It was after graduation that they decided to create what is now known as Drop City. They had decided to build it themselves using scrap materials which was neglected as waste by society. With very little cost and a lot of ingenuity, the first geodesic dome was built.

It wasn’t long until their innovative geometric structures and solar panels attracted the help of other artists, pioneers, and inventors. This community of droppers not only built homes but were building a social evolution. Their commune was later signed off to a non-profit making the land “free to all people” to inspire people to work together (without bosses) and support experimental artistic expression. By 1977 it’s last inhabitants left the commune, and by the 90’s the last structure had been taken down.

These beautiful photos and inhabitant’s stories are what’s left of drop city’s legacy.

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Shades of Life and Death in Varanasi


















Sometimes it is the least picture perfect moments that end up being the most picturesque. Varanasi is definitely one of those places I can never really begin to unravel. I have pieces of writings in my journal, an attempt to re-write in my iphone notes, a few drafts on the blog, but it’s almost impossible to put into words something that intense and mind-altering. We left the beautiful Tibetan town of Dharamsala filled with artsy cafes, prayer flags, immense mountain beauty and English conversations with backpackers for one of the oldest cities in the world: Varanasi. We found ourselves outside of our comfort zone all over again, and an all too familiar feeling.

Mark Twain once said: “Varanasi” is older than history, older than tradition, older even than legend, and looks twice as old as all of them put together”

The ancient streets were just wide enough for two people to walk by or one cow. We were here during the end of May, and the heat was almost too much to bare. The smell of dung (dog, cow, and people) simmered on concrete as you step over piles of rubble. There is no road signs or road names and I felt as if these alleyways were winding in every direction beneath my feet. You faced all shades of life and death and every facet of holy sadhus. Here you see Hinduism practiced fully all day, it’s a sacred experience and it’s easy to understand how this is the holiest city. As you pass by open windows, many are inside their homes praying to their alters. Crowds push by you as they rush to a ceremony or head to the Ganges. The Ganges display a visual that will have you feeling everything at once. To see people bathing in the same place that ashes of the dead float on is hard to grasp. Varanasi made me realize just how powerful these uncomfortable situations are, and the lessons behind the strangeness of life. It reminded me of how sheltered I am, how little I know, and how there are infinite truths I am still left to question.